Home » Ways to give » Gift & estate planning » Professional advisors »

Professional advisors

Helping clients realize their charitable goals is an important part of your practice. As you are aware, there are many opportunities to reduce taxes, increase current income and create a meaningful family legacy.  We’re here to support by providing customized clause language for wills or tax-effective charitable gift options.  

You can consult directly with us to have a custom clause prepared for you or have your client’s legal advisor call to discuss their plans in confidence.

Consider how your client would like their gift utilized at SFU:

  • Unrestricted gifts support an area of greatest promise or need
  • Restricted gifts go to a specific area or purpose
  • Expendable gifts are spent and used in their entirety over a designated period of time
  • Endowed gifts last in perpetuity 

Here are a few examples of the types of clauses to discuss with your client:

  • Specific gift clauses are used when your client would like SFU to receive a certain asset or dollar amount, or perhaps a set percentage of their estate.
  • Residual gift clauses are used when your client would like SFU to receive a portion of their estate after all specific gifts have been made.
  • Tax eliminator clauses direct your client’s estate trustee to calculate the taxes owing on their estate and make a donation to SFU from their estate that will offset those taxes.
  • Trust remainder clauses direct your client’s estate trustee to set up an income fund for your client’s spouse and/or children but when they no longer need the income, whatever is left over will be given to SFU.
  • Contingency clauses describe a gift for SFU that will only happen if someone who is named in your client’s will dies before they do.

 

 

Related Stories

While caring for her ailing father, Lorna experienced first-hand the gaps that exist within seniors' health care, particularly for patients with dementia.

When Barry and Guenther began thinking about their legacy, SFU seemed the natural choice for their bequests.

In 1967, Sylvia was 30, with a young daughter and no formal education. She’d once dreamed of being a teacher, but without a high school diploma, what was she going to do?